+61 434 196 897 secretary@acms.org.au

Our Collection

With over 20,000 items in our collection, we are more equipped to open displays to the public than any other private or public institution currently preserving electronic, analogue and mechanical computing history in Australia.

PDP-8 [1965]

PDP-8 [1965]

The PDP-8 was a 12-bit mini-computer produced by Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) and was introduced in 1965. It was the worlds first commercially successful mini-computer with over 50,000 being sold and its low cost and high volume meant it was available to many...

read more
APPLE II (1977)

APPLE II (1977)

A genius of open-ended design, a true poem of elegance, excellence and expandability, the Apple II was the realisation of a dream Steve Wozniak had been harbouring since his early days at the Homebrew Computer Club in Menlo Park, CA...

read more
COMMODORE 64 (1982)

COMMODORE 64 (1982)

Now here is a real rockstar of a home computer! Released in 1982, it would soon dominate the market, with over 12.5 million units sold over 11 years. The C64, as it is affectionately known, is still in use today by hardcore enthusiasts…

read more
IBM AS/400 (1988)

IBM AS/400 (1988)

IBM introduced this computer in 1988, and announced more than 1,000 software packages (the biggest simultaneous applications announcement in computer history). The AS/400 family includes six processor models. It offers double the performance of the System/38 and 5x..

read more
TRS-80 LINE (TANDY RADIO SHACK) (1977)

TRS-80 LINE (TANDY RADIO SHACK) (1977)

Part of the “holy trinity” of early home computers, the TRS-80 (or “Trash-80”, to its detractors) was as infamous as it was trailblazing. Boasting a Zilog-80 processor, early revisions lacked the magnetic shielding to prevent RF waves from the processor...

read more
TYPE 026 CARD PUNCH (1949)

TYPE 026 CARD PUNCH (1949)

Truly, a blast from the past. Long before we walked around with touchscreen keyboards, computers had to receive input through punched holes in cards. Here we have an IBM 026, announced in 1949. The heart of the 024 and 026 keypunches was a set of twelve relays...

read more
IBM 1401(1959)

IBM 1401(1959)

The 1401 is considered to be the first fully transistorised computer of the mainframe era. Over 12,000 units were produced; many were leased or resold after they were replaced with newer technology. The 1401 was withdrawn from IBM sales catalogues on February 8,1971...

read more
Big Magnetic Drum

Big Magnetic Drum

Now here’s a big magnetic drum – this thing, roughly the size of a small washing machine (and weighing far, far more), used to be the standard method for storing data. This has individual read/write heads…

read more
THE MICROBEE SYSTEM (1982)

THE MICROBEE SYSTEM (1982)

The Microbee system was designed and developed in Australia. The descendant of S-100 systems, it was originally sold as a DIY kit, but went on to become a prefabricated staple in Aussie classrooms and home offices....

read more
1950’s computing

1950’s computing

IBM 26 card punch (1950)Slide rules – Fuller cylindrical, Hemi, circular, special purpose etc Calculating aids – Tamaya Planix 5000 planimeter Mechanical Calculators – 1930s Comptometer, Curta, Contex, Facit, Odhner Electrical calculators – 1930 NCR...

read more