+61 434 196 897 secretary@acms.org.au

About Us

Our History

The Australian Computer Museum Society was set up to preserve and exhibit the artifacts of computing history in Australia, and with it, documentation, software, and peripherals – back to the beginning! One of our ongoing initiatives is to record the
histories of people and organisations that pioneered, used and developed computing equipment and associated technologies.

We hope to educate Australians on the history of this technology, which today permeates every aspect of our daily lives – we will do this by means of online reference material and by producing articles and booklets for distribution, along with the public exhibition of representative artifacts. We also plan to initiate educational classes and skill-sharing societies to drive innovation and creative disruption/evolution. 

Our Executive Team

Professor Jennifer Seberry

President
Professor and Former Head, Department of Computer Science. Foundation Professor and formerly Director, Centre for Computer Security Research, University of Wollongong.
Professor and Former Head, Department of Computer Science. Foundation Professor and formerly Director, Centre for Computer Security Research, University of Wollongong.  She is also known as "The Hadamard Matrix Lady", the "Mother of Cryptology in Australia" and "The Grandmother of Computer Security".

David Hayman

Vice President
David began his career as a computer technician and engineer in the 1970’s, before starting his own company in 1985.
David began his career as a computer technician and engineer in the 1970’s, before starting his own company in 1985. After 14 years of successful operations as a market leader in Australia and overseas, Integrand Solutions was sold in 1999 to Avnet Inc USA. Since then, David has provided consulting and project management to companies and individuals.

John Geremin

Chief Curator & Treasurer
With a career in technology dating back to the 1960's, John Geremin brings a plethora of experiences and insights into the way technology has evolved through the 20th Century to now.
With a career in technology dating back to the 1960’s, John Geremin brings a plethora of experiences and insights into the way technology has evolved through the 20th Century to now.

John Webster

Secretary
John Webster has more than 50 years IT experience, beginning with valve computer UTECOM at UNSW in 1960, continuing with IBM mainframes at UNSW, State and Commonwealth departments.
John Webster has more than 50 years’ IT experience, beginning with valve computer UTECOM at UNSW in 1960, continuing with IBM mainframes at UNSW, State and Commonwealth departments. Plus outsourcers (also with AS/400 and Intel platforms). John as systems programmer / engineer was responsible for the successful installation and ongoing support of Operating Systems and over seventy IBM and third-party software products, including network control programs and Data Base / Data Communication software, plus the hardware configuration of processors and peripherals. John provided technical advice, documentation, ongoing training and desk consulting services to hundreds of users and staff whilst supporting operations 24-by-7. Contributions to Museum Activities John – shown left operating UNSW’s valve computer UTECOM in 1960 – will provide historical information and perspectives on computing during his fifty-plus years in the industry at diverse sites by talks and demonstrations utilising hardware items and documentation. The development of computing as a career and into an industry will be presented interleaved with the chronology of enabling technological innovations in hardware and software. John has produced many exhibits, hands-on activities and short talks for Open Days and seminars at Darling Harbour and UNSW. John has been active in the ACMS since 1998, helping to collect and preserve equipment and artefacts from Australia’s computing past, and to prepare histories of these and of people who have worked in computing and allied industries.

Some Other Committee Members

Tennyson Delarosa

Tennyson Delarosa

Tennyson has worked as a professional storyteller for more than a decade. His interest in technology and history have converged in his work for the ACMS. Tennyson brings skills, insights and disciplines from an impressively diverse range of fields.

Anne Jones

Anne Jones

First programming in binary, Anne Jones’ inovlvement in computers dates back to the 1950’s. An industry pioneer in every way, we are glad to count Anne among our number.

Riley Tipton Perry

Riley Tipton Perry

Riley Perry started programming on a TRS-80 Model I Level II, and has been at it ever since. He is also passionate about music, science, skepticism (aka rationalism), and the history of computer games. 

Development Team

These individuals are assisting the ACMS to grow into a fully-fledged, publicly and privately funded museum with displays open to the public. We acknowledge them here for their gracious donation of their expertise, insight, and financial support.

George Murdocca

 Sydney born and educated, George founded training school and consultancy LinuxDojo in 2016. He began his obsession with technology at the age of six with his first IBM XT clone PC in 1984. With a passion for practical understanding of computer systems he has enjoyed a successful career since 1999 in information security, Linux, systems integration, Python, DevOps and cloud platforms.     
 Sydney born and educated, George founded training school and consultancy LinuxDojo in 2016. He began his obsession with technology at the age of six with his first IBM XT clone PC in 1984. With a passion for practical understanding of computer systems he has enjoyed a successful career since 1999 in information security, Linux, systems integration, Python software development, DevOps and cloud platforms.
     

Joe Lemura

Joe Lemura graduated from UNSW in 1990 with a Bachelor of Science and Mathematics, Information Technology.
Joe Lemura graduated from UNSW in 1990 with a Bachelor of Science and Mathematics, Information Technology. Since then he has proven himself in the corporate arena, rising to the position of CIO of a large Asia based company. Joe’s enthusiasm and passion for vintage technologies are unrivalled.

Dave Burraston

David Burraston, PhD is an artist/scientist involved in technology and electronic music since the late 1970's. David was employed at British Telecom’s R&D Laboratory in diverse areas such as Artificial Life, Chaos and Complex Systems, Spatial Audio, Virtual Reality, and Data Visualisation. David has specialist knowledge of analogue and parallel computers, and many years of experience working with electronics.    
David Burraston, PhD is an artist/scientist involved in technology and electronic music since the late 1970’s. David was employed at British Telecom’s R&D Laboratory in diverse areas such as Artificial Life, Chaos and Complex Systems, Spatial Audio, Virtual Reality, and Data Visualisation. David has specialist knowledge of analogue and parallel computers, and many years of experience working with electronics.

Maurice Aiken

Maurice was a partner in Word Express, a leading supplier of Wang Computers in the 1980's. Maurice has previously held presidential and secretarial positions for the ACRA, is a past secretary of a Rotary Club chapter, and is presently also the director for the Australia China New Business Association.    
Maurice was a partner in Word Express, a leading supplier of Wang Computers in the 1980’s. Maurice has previously held presidential and secretarial positions for the ACRA, is a past secretary of a Rotary Club chapter, and is presently also the director for the Australia China New Business Association.

Alex Rosser

Alex's career in computing goes back to 1960 and SILLIAC, one of Australia's first computers, which he was programming in it's assembler/machine language. He has worked in many computer related fields and has a diverse range of skills and qualifications.
Alex's career in computing goes back to 1960 and SILLIAC, one of Australia's first computers, which he was programming in it's assembler/machine language. After graduating with Honours in Elec. Eng. in 1963 he practised as an electrical engineer for seven years. At Automatic Totalisators he helped develop the read/write electronics and coding for a disk drive. At Electic Control & Engineering he was programming an early analogue computer. At Schindler-Reliance in Switzerland he was writing FORTRAN on one of the early IBM computers.

Back in Australia in 1970 he joined IBM until 1983. Whilst there he worked as a systems engineer on various computers. On an IBM 1800, a mulkti-tasking process control computer, in FORTRAN and assembler. Later PL/1 and APL on System/360 mainframes and APL on the 5100 (IBM's predecessor to the PC). Then configuring System/7 process control machines. Then the 5250 range teaching RPG/2. In the PC era it was Visual Basic and COBOL.

He completed a part-time Graduate Diploma in Applied Finance and Investment at the Securities Institute in 2001. He read for an MBA part-time at Macquarie University, graduating in 1978. A year later, with temporary leave of absence from IBM, he took up a position as Visiting Senior Lecturer at the Sydney Institute of Technology (now UTS) to run an initial course on Management Theory for Computer Science students.

He left IBM in 1983 and after a brief period with a modem design company he established Rosser Communications P/L. This company originally marketed modems, but as they became commodity items the firm moved to statistical multiplexers and later routers. Rosser Communications became a Cisco gold partner, the smallest in Australia, and successfully competed with much biggest Cisco partners such as IBM. Rosser Communications was sold in 2007 whereupon Alex retired. However he has retained an active interest in technology, mathematics, and physics. This includes a Post-graduate diploma in HPS (History and Philosophy of Science) from Sydney University where his major thesis was on the history of modems in Australia. He graduated in 2012.